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A Must Read for Parents: Glow Kids: How Screen Addiction is Hijacking our Kids


Most parents are aware that unlimited screen time for young children is not a good idea. But did you know that digital screens are highly addictive? Dr. Nicholas Kardaras is one of the country’s foremost addiction experts. In his book Glow Kids: How Screen Addiction is Hijacking our Kids – and how to Break the Trance, he describes the horrifying extent of the problem, explains the science behind it in easy to understand language, and offers a solution. Please read this book for your children’s sake.




Dr. Cardaras discusses how...

  • Glowing screens are a powerful drug. Dr. Peter Whybrow, director of neuroscience at UCLA, calls it “electronic cocaine”. Chinese researchers use the term “electronic heroine”.

  • Screen tech causes psychiatric disorders like ADHD, addiction, anxiety, depression, increased aggression or even psychosis.

  • Kindergartners were introduced to this drug with the arrival of i-pads.

  • Minecraft and other games for children are addictive and can cause states of psychosis.

  • RPGs, role-playing games, especially the mythical kind, attract teens whose lives are devoid of myths and heroic stories. Players become so addicted that they spend 12 hours or more without eating or sleep in the game. They enter a state of psychosis where they can no longer distinguish between reality and the game.Theresa Linden’s made this phenomenon part of her dystopian Liberty Trilogy. Read my review.

  • Even happy, well-adjusted kids get addicted. They tend to choose social media. Taking the smart phone away from a social media addicted teen, will result in typical drug withdrawal symptoms.

  • Violent electronic games have been linked to violent crime, including the Newtown Massacre.

  • Many working parents believe their screen-addicted kids are “safe” at home on their computer.

  • Educational games don’t educate.

Dr. Cardaras illustrates these problems with numerous case studies. Many happened during his work as a mental health provider at a high school, but he also talks about his work with young children.

The last chapter offers solutions for screen addicted kids. It’s basically cold turkey for four to six weeks to reset the brain, but he also talks about supplying healthy alternatives for the glow screen.

I was already aware of the danger of screens before I read this book. However, I did not realize the shocking extent of screen addiction. Neither did I realize that glow screens actually cause chemical changes in the body. This book is a great tool to convince unbelievers, including your kids. (I should mention here that my teen daughter Irene read the book before me and that she often reminds her mom not to spend too much time on the computer).




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